{tab=Dance}Pond Full Of Stars

By: Kalia Kliban (2010)
Music: Pond Full Of Stars (John Berger, 2010)
Formation: Square set

A1 1-2 Circle figure: (Take hands) Circle left (keep circle big)  
  3-4 In and out a double  
  5-6 Circle right  
  7-8 In a double, release hands, fall out into a longways set (1s at the top, 3s at the bottom and 2s facing 4s)  
       
B1 1-2 Longways chorus: (At each end) star right (exactly once around)  
  3-4 Middle four star left (exactly once around) while ends right-hand balance forward and back (with partner) and cast away from each other to form a cross-wise set  
  5-6 (At each end) star right (exactly once around)  
  7-8 (Ends take right hand with opposite, middles take right hands with partner) balance forward and back, ends cast cast home (to meet partner) while middles lead to home place (ie reform the square)  
       
A2 1-2 Siding figure: Partner side-by-side right and back  
  3-4 Parftner gypsy right  
  5-6 Partner side-by-side left and back  
  7-8 Partner gypsy left (1s and 3s moving in to end in a crosswise set, 2s and 4s at the ends, 1s and 3s facing each otherin the center)  
       
B2 1-8 Crossways chorus: Same as longways chorus except ends cast away from each other to form a long-wise set in bars 3-4  
       
A3 1-8 Circle figure: as in A1  
       
B3 1-8 Longways chorus: As in A2  
       
A4 1-2 Arming figure: Partner arm right 1.5 (end facing away from partner)  
  3-4 (With the one you face) arm left (end facing partner)  
  5-6 Partner arm right 1.5 (end facing away from partner)  
  7-8 (With the one you face) arm left (1s and 3s moving in to end in a crosswise set, 2s and 4s at the ends, 1s and 3s facing each otherin the center)  
       
B4 1-8 Crossways chorus: Same as B2  
       
A5 1-8 Circle figure: as in A1, but end in a square set and honor your partner  
       
Notes 1 4 steps/bar. The tune should be played at a gentle walking pace, around 80-86ish.  
  2 Circle Figures -- Try to keep the movements of the circle and the in-a-double distinct from each other. Don’t spiral in. Circle only as far around as makes sense for the set. When forming the longways set in bars 13-16 (A 1, 3 only), the sides don’t have far to go. They can lead in a double with everyone else and as the heads fall back they can orient themselves toward their corners for the upcoming star.  
  3 Star Choruses -- The dancers on the ends of the set (i.e. the ones who balance and cast rather than making a star in the middle), can put their left hands in their pockets. Everything they do is right-handed. Also, it’s critical to turn all the stars exactly once around, no more, no less.  
  4 Arming Figure -- To go from the arm right 1-1/2 with partner to the arm left with the next person around the ring, it’s easiest to drop arms with your partner a little early and simply move past them to face the new person. Avoid the temptation to “flip” at the end of the arm right. The arming once around with the corner person travels noticeably slower than the arming 1-1/2 with partner.  
  5 The transition from the 2nd to the 3rd star can be very disorienting, but the middles have a specific sequence of dancers to look for, which can help immensely. The women will dance the 1st star with the woman on their right (as you stand in the square set), the 2nd with the woman opposite them, and the 3rd with the woman on their left. The men will dance the 1st star with the man on their left (as you stand in the square set), the 2nd with their opposite and the 3rd with the man on their right. Note that this sequence doesn’t apply when you’re on an end, just when you’re in the middle.  
  6 Kalia says "At Pinewoods English Week in 2010, Jon was on staff and I was along as a camper. For reasons neither of us could fathom (since we’d been married for almost 20 years) we got housed in the “honeymoon cottage,” a delightful cabin called Boatman. It’s on the edge of Round Pond and has a tiny back porch with steps leading right down into the water. After the dancing on the first night of camp we were sitting with our feet in the water, enjoying the night. There was no breeze at all and the water was like a mirror reflecting the clear sky full of stars. When the words “pond full of stars” came into my head I knew there was a dance to be written. Round Pond itself suggested the opening circle figure, and the stars eventually sorted themselves out. Jon wrote the tune to suit the mood of the quiet, starry night."  

 

© Kalia Kliban, 2010 {tab=Music}

Pond Full Of Stars

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Pond Full Of Stars

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